The Madness

What does it take to achieve perfection?

Millions of people all across the U.S. full out a March Madness bracket every year, yet this world has still yet to see the perfect one.

What causes this discrepancy? Bad match ups? Incorrect seeding by the so-called experts at ranking the teams against each other? If you were to ask a follower of the tournament, they would tell you that it’s the “magic”.

2014 was a prime example of the so-called Magic that is so-often coupled with the Men’s NCAA Basketball Tournament. While first-seeded squads Wichita State and Florida were favored to win the whole tournament, seventh-seed UCONN took the prize, winning the championship over the even lower seeded #8 Kentucky.

While title runs as spectacular as these may not happen every year, it still puzzles the mind to wonder how such incredible feats are accomplished by such, for the lack of a better term, un-incredible teams.

As time goes on, these games become even more and more exciting. Historically, a 16 seed (the lowest possible ranking a team is able to receive in the tournament) has traditionally been blown out by their opponent 1 seeds, often by scores of over 20 points. In fact, a sixteen seed has never once beaten a one seed in the tournament, but that is likely to change in the near future. According to oddsshark.com, in 2014, the sixteenth seed beat the spread against the first seed in 3 of the 4 games played between them. This trend is evident in all games, not just the 1-16 games. In 2013, Florida Gulf Coast University became the first 15 seed to ever reach the sweet sixteen, after upsetting both #2 Georgetown and #7 San Diego State during its cinderella run to the third round of the tournament.

With all of these upsets that are seen so frequently in the annual NCAA Men’s tournament, the question begs to be asked… How do these teams pull it off?

I guess it must just be the magic.

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